Self-Care for Writers

It seems fitting that I'm writing about self care after having to take time off of work due to a migraine. This is also why my post is coming out on a Wednesday. Normally I would have fought through it, kept working, and made it worse. The fact that I was going to write this post made me rethink my decision because, truthfully, if I'm going to tell you how to take care of yourselves, I need to listen to my own advice. 

I've covered some of this in other posts, but I wanted to create a comprehensive list for anyone who feels burnt out or needs some support in regards to taking care of themselves. Many writers don't know what kind of self care they should do when they feel low or if they need self care at all. Here are a few warning signs to start off. 

  • Anxiety/depression

  • Exhaustion

  • Lack of desire to write or writer's block 

  • Irritability 

  • Self-doubt or feeling hopeless 

  • Overwhelmed

Some are you going to say, "Well, Erin, I feel this all the time!" I understand. I feel a lot of this as well, but when it's starting to affect your everyday life, you need to step back and take care of yourselves so you can stay healthy. A healthy mind and body will lead to better writing. 

  • Take a break/ Do something you love: If you're feeling low and the depression is creeping in, try to take a break and do something you love. Even if you think it's just "wasting time," it's not if it makes you happy. Play video games. Read a book. Go to a pet store and play with some critters. Host a movie night. Watch youtube videos. Or sleep! Basically do anything except write if writing itself is causing so much stress. Contrary to what others say, you don't have to write everyday. 

  • Sleep: Writers are pretty bad about getting enough sleep. Either we stay up too late or get up too early trying to get those words out. Consider adjusting your sleeping schedule so you're getting more rest both for your brain and body. You'll find you'll become more productive and feel better. 

  • Get off social media: If you're struggling with self-doubt or comparing yourself to others, get off Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pintrest, etc. Shut technology down for a day and focus on you. Studies say that people often become more depressed after seeing all the accomplishments or exciting adventures their peers talk about on facebook. I know when I'm feeling overwhelmed, shutting down technology is my best route to recovery. It'll still be there when you log on the next day. 

  • Shower/Take a bath: If you're stuck with writing, take a shower. Some of my best ideas come out there. And if you just want to get away from ideas and relax, take a shower or a bath for your body's sake. I love how the water pounds across my ears and silences the world. For a moment, I just feel safe and like the world doesn't need me. I'm doing this for me. 

  • Take time for yourself: Make sure you're taking enough time to rest and relax. If all you're doing is overworking yourself to get that book done or meet social media standards, you're going to burn out very quickly. Take time, again, to do something you love, or take care of yourself. Even setting aside a half hour a day to watch a favorite show or sit under happy lights is a great way to decompress. 

  • Chores: This may seem like a strange thing to add in here if you're stressed, but sometimes getting chores done helps me unwind. Cleaning, paying pills, making medical appointments, going shopping, etc.. Sure, it might be boring or frustrating at the time, but by the end of the day, you'll have accomplished so much. Last Sunday I managed to get a bunch of chores done and that cleared my mind up to write for a little while. 

  • Therapy: If you're struggling with crippling self-doubt, depression, anxiety, or suicidal thoughts, consider talking with a therapist. I see one regularly to help me keep my head on straight. People will say, "Oh, others have it worse" but whatever you're going through is valid. If something is making you upset or hurting your quality of life, then it's important to get that treated. Seeking out therapy is not a weakness. It shows strength. 

  • Listen to your body: If you're getting sick a lot, or you just don't feel well, listen to your body. It may be telling you that it's time to slow down. We only have one body and one brain. If either goes out on us, we're in trouble. So take care of yourselves. If you'd tell someone else to go to a doctor, take off of work, or rest if they feel like you do, then please take your own advice. 

  • Support team: Build a support team so that, when you're struggling, you know who you can turn to. Maybe you just need someone to listen to you as you struggle through your writing ideas. Maybe you need a hug or a reminder that you're enough. Either way, reach out when you need support. You don't have to go this alone. That's what's both so important and wonderful about having a writing community. 

  • Write your feelings: We may all get writer's block, but I guarantee we can all write about how we're feeling. No one else has to see it or know that you're writing it. Create angry poetry, construct short stories, write a blog post...do whatever feels right to help you acknowledge your emotions and work through them. 

  • Hydrate: When we get wrapped up in writing, it's easy to forget some basic needs like drinking water. And sometimes we can forget that tea is a diuretic. So make sure you're hydrating your body (even if it does mean a lot of pee breaks away from your computer). 

These are just a few tips to keep in mind when things feel rough. I'm sure you all have your own self-care methods, so feel free to share them below! 

Just remember, you matter, what you feel is valid, and you are worthy of self care. 

Depression and Writing: Don't End Your Story

People often ask me why I write. I give them plenty of answers like, it's what I was born to do (cheesy, I know), it's as vital to me as the air I breathe (also cheesy), I love to create new worlds, I have stories to tell, etc. etc. Writing is also my outlet when I'm stressed or depressed. When I slip into the text and the world falls away, I feel a warmth in my chest that dissipates every awful thing I'm feeling. I'm lost in the story, and everything feels right with the world. In a way, my writing saves me from my negative emotions. 

But what about those times when it can't? What about the times when writer's block is so strong is drives me into a downward spiral of depression? 

I've written about anxiety, depression, and writing before, but what happened a week ago is very different. 

On February 2nd, my depression almost won. I won't go into great detail, but I checked myself into a psychiatric ward with the guidance and support of a friend so that I could take care of my mental health.

So I wouldn't end my story.  

You see, I love writing, but I do the same thing many writers do. I attach my self worth to my craft. If I can't write, I feel like something's wrong with me and I stress myself out more than necessary. It's habit. It's worse when I have a block on a big project I want to complete such as Purple Door District 2. For months I've struggled and felt disconnected with my craft. That's bad enough, but when writing is supposed to be an emotional outlet, and I lose that, I sometimes feel like I lose my purpose too. 

Don't get me wrong, a lot of things compounded over the months to make me so depressed, but not being able to write was a huge part of it. Writers tend to forget about their mental health when they're so busy creating. We get swept up in what we should be getting done or how we're not doing enough that we forget the warning signs our brain sends us when we've pushed ourselves too far. 

-Lack of interest in the things we love

-Unable to deal with daily stresses

-Losing sleep over worry

-Beating ourselves down for not writing because we see ourselves as failures

Sound familiar? I was feeling all of this, and yet I didn't realize just how depressed I was until it was almost too late. I've said it before and I'll say it again. I'm not shy when it comes to talking about my mental health. Several writers on twitter have been told that they shouldn't discuss their emotions or mental health because it's "unprofessional" or "no one wants to hear their drama." 

Bullshit. 

Talking about how you feel makes you more real. It makes you more human and relatable. If Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and blog posts are your outlets and the only places you feel safe talking about your emotions, then do it. The United States has such a stigma about mental health, like it's a hush hush topic that no one should talk about.

Again, I call bullshit. If we talked about it, then maybe more people would know when to reach out for help. Maybe more creative minds would realize they're not alone in their struggles and there are people who care what happens to them. 

You are not your craft. Your worth is not measured by your word or page count, or your amazon reviews, or the number of books under your belt. 

One of the things that struck me the hardest about going into the psychiatric ward was when the therapist said, "You're a writer? Oh yeah, I've probably seen most of the writers in the city here." What does that tell you about us creative folk? We push and push and beat ourselves down when we should be lifting ourselves and others up for our/their accomplishments. 

So in case no one has said this to you today, you matter. You are amazing. You are loved. And you have a purpose. No matter how lonely you feel, there's a community out there that understands what you're going through. If you're too nervous to call someone for help, then try #writingcommunity on Twitter, or any number of writing hashtags on instagram. Believe me, you'll find that there are more people like you than you even realize. 

And during those really bad moments, when you feel like the world is coming down and you can't see the light at the end of the tunnel, please consider calling the suicide hotline: 1-800-273-8255. 

Your story isn't over yet, and the world wants to hear it. You're not alone. 

Writing With Anxiety

Let me paint a picture for you. It's the middle of the night, and you've just completed a chapter in your book. When you crawled into bed, you were excited with your progress. But as the clock ticks on, you start to dread what's on paper. What if it doesn't work? What if it's not good enough? What if I'm not good enough? What if I can't cut it as an author? What if I'll never get published? What if---

I'm pretty sure I'm not alone when I say that anxiety sucks.

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